Pollution Pods launch at Starmus

 

 

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June 18, 2017 – July 7, 2017

 

A series of domes containing pollution from cities around the world will be placed in the Norwegian city of Trondheim as part of an investigation by psychologists to ascertain whether art can really change people’s perception of climate change.

 

Five interconnected geodesic domes will contain carefully mixed recipes emulating the relative presence of ozone, particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and carbon monoxide which pollute London, New Delhi, San Paolo and Beijing. Starting from a coastal location in Norway, the visitor will pass through increasingly polluted cells, from dry and cold locations to hot and humid.

 
The release of toxic gases from domestic and industrial sources both increase the rate of global warming and have a direct effect on our present-day health. In the West, in cities such as London, one in five children suffer from asthma, whilst in the developing countries such as Delhi, over half the children have stunted lung development and will never completely recover.

 
Whilst those in the developed world live in an environment with relatively clean air, people in countries such as China and India are being poisoned by the airborne toxins created from industries fulfilling orders from the West. The experience of walking through the pollution pods demonstrates that these worlds are interconnected and interdependent. The desire for ever cheaper goods is reflected in the ill-health of many people in world and in the ill-health of our planet as a whole. Within this installation we will be able to feel, taste and smell the toxic environments that are the norm for a huge swathe of the world’s population.

 
Pollution Pods has been commissioned by NTNU as part of Climart a four-year research project that examines the underlying psychological mechanisms involved in both the production and reception of visual art using these findings in an attempt to unite the natural sciences to the visual arts. The project is funded by the Norwegian Research Council and is housed at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway.

 
Pollution Pods will be shown as part of the STARMUS festival in Trondheim, Norway. The STARMUS festival is an international gathering focused on celebrating astronomy, space exploration, music and art. Scientists and astronomers including Stephen Hawking and Buzz Aldrin will be speaking as part of this festival.

Norwegian Research Council
Build With Hubs
The Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU)
Airlabs
University of East London

 
If you would like to attend the launch event please email here for more information.

 
Pollution Pods is located on Festning, 7014 Trondheim. 63°25’42.0″N 10°24’44.1″E
https://goo.gl/maps/LfDHpmG9TfN2
Opening hours
Tuesday -Saturday 12.00 – 20.00
Sunday 12.00 – 18.00

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Lurking deep below the surface of Ourcq Canal jettisoned objects await recovery. Over the years their surfaces have gained the complexion of aquatic wreckage. For L’eau Qui Dort, the artist Michael Pinsky has used divers and cranes to dredge the canals and extract this debris.

 

Forty of these ghostly objects have mysteriously appeared upright on the surface of the canal water, bathed in aquamarine light. Again visible, these bicycles, shopping trolleys, signs and fridges confront their owners, demonstrating that society’s desire for the new can only be supported by rendering the old invisible.

 

A strange and beautiful soundtrack has been generated from these objects played by those who live around the canal. Each night this eerie composition emanates from spaces around the canal to form an intricate three-dimensional soundscape.

 

L’eau Qui Dort has been commissioned by COAL for La Villette during COP21 in Paris. The installation can be visited from November 25th 2015 until January 3rd 2016 and is free to the public.

 

 

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ICA: Culture Now: Marjetica Potrc in conversation with Stephanie Delcroix and Michael Pinsky

Institute of Contemporary Arts, London            20 Feb 20151:00 pm | Cinema 1 |

 Ljubljana and Berlin-based artist and architect Marjetica Potrč is joined in conversation by Stephanie Delcroix and Michael Pinsky, discussing her practice ahead of the opening of a new public artwork made in collaboration with Ooze Architects (Eva Pfannes and Sylvain Hartenberg). Commissioned by Stephanie Delcroix and Michael Pinsky for King’s Cross, Of Soil and Water: The King’s Cross Pond Club is a natural swimming pond on the Kings Cross site. Its central pool is surrounded by both hard and soft landscaping, including pioneer plants, wild flowers grasses, and bushes so that the environment evolves as the seasons change.

Climate Week logo 2013 high resolution RGB EditPlunge was a finalist in the 2013 Climate Week Awards. Climate Week is a national occasion that offers an annual renewal of our ambition and confidence to combat climate change. The Climate Week Awards recognise the most inspirational and impressive actions taking place in every sector of society.
www.climateweek.com

 

http://plungelondon.com/awards/